Hapi.js and MongoDB

During the Fullstack conference I saw a small project made with Hapi.js during a talk, so I decided to invest some time working with Hapi.js in order to investigate how easy it was create a Node.js application with this framework.

I’ve to admit, this is a framework really well done, with a plugin system that give you a lot of flexibility when you are creating your server side applications and with a decent community that provides a lot of useful information and plugins in order to speed up the projects development.

When I started to read the only book available on this framework I was impressed about the simplicity, the consideration behind the framework but more important I was impressed where Hapi.js was used for the first time.
The first enterprise app made with this framework was released during Black Friday on Walmart ecommerce. The results were amazing!
In fact one of the main contributor of this open source framework is Walmart labs, that means a big organisation with real problems to solve; definitely a good starting point!

Express vs Hapi.js

If you are asking why not express, I can reply with few arguments:

  • express is a super light and general purpose framework that works perfectly for small – medium size application.
  • hapi.js was built on top of express at the beginning but then they move away in order to create something more solid and with more built in functionalities, a framework should speed up your productivity and not giving you a structure to follow.
  • express is code base instead hapi.js is configuration base (with a lot of flexibility of course)
  • express uses middleware, hapi.js uses plugins
  • hapi.js is built with testing and security in mind!

Hapi.js

Let’s start saying working with this framework is incredibly easy when you understand the few concepts you need to know in order to create a Node project.

I created a sample project where I’ve integrated a mongo database, exposing few end points in order to add a new document inside a mongo collection, update a specific document, retrieve all documents available inside the database and  retrieving all the details of a selected document.

Inside the git repo you can find also the front end code (books.html in the project root) in Vanilla Javascript, mainly because if you are passionate about React or Angular or any other front end library, you’ll be able to understand the integration without any particular framework knowledge.

What I’m going to describe now will be how I’ve structured the server side code with Hapi.js.

In order to create a server in Hapi.js you just need few lines of code:

let server = new Hapi.Server();
server.connection();
server.start((err) => console.log('Server started at:', server.info.uri));

As you can see in the example (src/index.js) I’ve created the server in the first few lines after the require statements and I started the server (server.start) after the registration of the mongoDB plugin, but one step per time.

After creating the server object, I’ve defined my routes with server.route method.
The route method will allow you to set just 1 route with an object or several routes creating an array of objects.
Each route should contain the method parameter where you’ll define the method to reach the path, you can also set a wildcard (*) so any method will be accepted in order to retrieve that path.
Obviously then you have to set the route path, bear in mind you have to start always with slash (/) in order to define correctly the path.
The path accepts also variables inside curly brackets as you can see in the last route of my example: path: ‘/bookdetails/{id}’.

Last but not least you need to define what’s going to happen when a client is requesting that particular path specifying the handler property.
Handler expects a function with 2 parameters: request and reply.

This is a basic route implementation:

{
   method: 'GET',
   path: '/allbooks',
   handler: (request, reply) => { ... }
}

When you structure a real application, and not an example like this one, you can wrap the handler property inside the config property.
Config accepts an object that will become your controller for that route.
So as you can see it’s really up to you pick up the right design solution for your project, it could be inline because it’s a small project or a PoC rather than an external module because you have a large project where you want to structure properly your code in a MVC fashion way (we’ll see that in next blog post ;-)).
In my example I created the config property also because you can then use an awesome library called JOI in order to validate the data received from the client application.
Validate data with JOI is really simple:

validate: {
   payload: {
      title: Joi.string().required(),
      author: Joi.string().required(),
      pages: Joi.number().required(),
      category: Joi.string().required()
   }
}

In my example for instance I checked if I receive the correct amount of arguments (required()) and in the right format (string() or number()).

MongoDB plugin

Now that we have understood how to create a simple server with Hapi.js let’s go in deep on the Hapi.js plugin system, the most important part of this framework.
You can find several plugins created by the community, and on the official website you can find also a tutorial that explains step by step how to create a custom plugin for hapi.js.

In my example I used the hapi-mongodb plugin that allows me to connect a mongo database with my node.js application.
If you are more familiar with mongoose you can always use the mongoose plugin for Hapi.js.
One important thing to bear in mind of an Hapi.js plugin is that when it’s registered will be accessible from any handler method via request.server.plugins, so it’s injected automatically from the framework in order to facilitate the development flow.
So the first thing to do in order to use our mongodb plugin on our application is register it:

server.register({
   register: MongoDB,
   options: DBConfig.opts
}, (err) => {
   if (err) {
      console.error(err);
      throw err;
   }

   server.start((err) => console.log('Server started at:', server.info.uri));
});

As you can see I need just to specify which plugin I want to use in the register method and its configuration.
This is an example of the configuration you need to specify in order to connect your MongoDB instance with the application:

module.exports = {
   opts: {
      "url": "mongodb://username:password@id.mongolab.com:port/collection-name",       
      "settings": {          
         "db": {             
            "native_parser": false         
         }
      }    
   }
}

In my case the configuration is an external object where I specified the mongo database URL and the settings.
If you want a quick and free solution to use mongoDB on the cloud I can suggest mongolab, when you register you’ll have 500mb of data for free per account, so for testing purpose is really the perfect cloud service!
Last but not least, when the plugin registration happened I can start my server.

When I need to use your plugin inside any handler function I’ll be able to retrieve my plugin in this way:

var db = request.server.plugins['hapi-mongodb'].db;

In my sample application, I was able to create few cases: add a new document (addbook route), retrieve all the books (allbooks route) and the details of a specific book (bookdetails route).

Screen Shot 2015-12-04 at 23.44.38

If you want to update a record in mongo, remember to use update method over insert method, because, if correctly handled, update method will check inside your database if there are any other occurrences and if there is one it will update that occurrence otherwise it will create a new document inside the mongo collection.
Below an extract of this technique, where you specify in the first object the key for searching an item, then the object to replace with and last object you need to add is an object with upsert set to true (by default is false) that will allow you to create the new document if it doesn’t exist in your collection:

db.collection('books').updateOne({"title": request.payload.title}, dbDoc, {upsert: true}, (err, result) => {
    if(err) return reply(Boom.internal('Internal MongoDB error', err));
    return reply(result);
});

SAMPLE PROJECT GITHUB REPOSITORY

Resources

If you are interested to go more in deep about Hapi.js, I’d suggest to take a look to the official website or to the book currently available.
An interesting news is that there are other few books that will be published soon regarding Hapi.js:

that usually means Hapi js is getting adopt from several companies and developers and definitely it’s a good sign for the health of the framework.

Wrap up

In this post I shared with you a quick introduction to Hapi.js framework and his peculiarities.
If you’ve enjoyed please let me know what you would interested on so I’ll be able to prepare other posts with the topics you prefer.
Probably the next one will be on the different template systems (handlebars, react…) or about universal application (or isomorphic application as you prefer to call them) or a test drive of few plugins to use in Hapi.js web applications.

Anyway I’ll wait for your input as well😀

2015 the birth of London JS community

We are very close to the end of 2015 and it’s time give a look back to the first 11 months of this year understanding what I’ve accomplished and trying to get some resolutions for the new year as well!

2015 for my professional life  was a year of changes: I moved to a new job, I learnt new programming paradigms (reactive and functional programming), I met a lot of incredible and talented  people and many many other things.

Probably the biggest changes (or old loves?) are the creation of London JavaScript community and my returning as speaker on technical talks after a couple of years of inactivity.

Last May I started a new adventure creating a new JavaScript community in London; I spent a month to understand how and why I could do that properly.
I had the possibility in the past to be staff member of the largest Actionscript Italian community and it was really a great experience.
I was young, with a lot of passion, not much experience and the community was the perfect place for growing properly, meeting new friends, learning from the different people, trying to solve technical puzzle everyday and having fun why not!

Starting again this experience in a new country it was a real challenge for me, but this time, with way more experience than the first time, clear ideas and a touch of madness.

In 2013 I had the opportunity to spend few months in Silicon Valley and I went to several meetup events and conferences from San Francisco to San Jose.
What I was really impressed of that environment was for sure the vibe I was able to breathe in any of these events.
People from all over the world that help each others, facilitating the connections between individuals, creating opportunities and sharing knowledge.
I was astonished about this way of doing community and when I moved from Italy to London I spent the first 18 months going to different events trying to retrieve the same experience and vibe.

When I started the London Javascript community my main goal was definitely recreating that vibe in this great city where the best developers all over the world are working in interesting projects with a lots of challenges to solve.
That’s why I decided to do that, filling a gap present in London communities where there were many and strong vertical framework communities (like React and Angular one), but not a strong and general JavaScript community.

After 8 months I’ve to admit I’m very happy about the results that this community was able to generate:

  • ~1400 members
  • 7 live events
  • 1 code lab for half day
  • 2 webinars
  • an average of 60 people per event
  • Listed as O’Reilly Community partner, Google Community and Skillsmatter Community
  • Community Partner of great events like: FullStack conference and Dot.JS conference
  • more than 1900 tweets & retweets with more than 500 followers

I had also the opportunity to meet great speakers, amazing developers and passionate people.

What this community is giving me back is really invaluable and really hard to find in similar activities too, I’m really grateful of any single moment spent organising any event.

What about the resolutions for 2016?

Recently I started to gather the interest from several companies that are asking me to organise meetup events in their offices and that means all the hard work done is paying this community back!

I contacted few speakers from California and next year I’m organising a couple of webinars with speakers from Silicon Valley and directly from Google office in Mountain View.

I’m already in contact with few great speakers ready to share with the community tips and tricks on different topics like webpack, jspm, angular, webrtc, react and ES6! Keep an eye on the community page in order to discover more about these events.

Last but not least, I’m working right now on the official community website that will be a SPA website with socials integration and the possibility to subscribe to a technical newsletter where I’m going to share the best articles, tutorials and events on the web.

Obviously these are already in the roadmap but I’m really open to listen what the JavaScript community is looking for! So don’t waste this opportunity and share your ideas on how to grow and make more special OUR community!

ES2015 Destructuring assignment: by value or reference?

This week I’ve organised a meetup on ES2015 in my community, where the speaker presented his favourite features of the language.

Right after the talk I had a chance to talk with my best friend that was asking if destructuring assigns the values copying the value to the new variable or instead by reference if you work with Object or Array.
Because I hadn’t a change before to work with this new ES2015 feature I did a quick example just to get an answer to this question.

It looks like destructuring feature works by reference and it’s not copying the value.
That means anytime you’re going to change a value inside a variable that contains an Object or Array assigned via destructuring, also the original Object or Array will be affected as you can see in this simple example: destructuring example ES2015

destructuring ES2015

So when you work with destructuring bear in mind to pay a lot of attention when you change a value inside your destructured Objects and Arrays!

HaXe, my new toy!

After Adobe MAX 2011 everything should not be the same for me and maybe for a lot of flash platform developers around the world, Adobe brings some “directions”  that didn’t find my consent mainly for the way that communicate these news and the impact that had in the market, but we know that Flash Platform is not dead and it will go ahead for many years.
Obviously nothing was the same after that, in fact many developers started to look around for new technologies and frameworks like Backbone.js, Sencha Touch, Ext JS and so on.
Personally I started to checked in last few months many Javascript frameworks because my aim was find something that could replace Flash Platform in the future and I have to spend time in next years to consolidate it and go ahead with Flash Platform too.
Last week a big friend of mine gave me this link: http://www.haxenme.org/ and when I started to read what you can do and how you can do it, I immediately started to go in deep with HaXe in my spare time and trust me that I had a lot of fun!

First of all what is HaXe?
HaXe is an open source multiplatform programming language, it allows to write once and deploy everywhere (in the right meaning of therm “everywhere”).
In fact with HaXe we can write in a programming language similar to Actionscript 3 (strictly typed, OOP, …) but more powerful (it has enum, generics, dynamic type, …), with HaXe we can target our projects for Flash, C++, Neko, HTML5, Node.JS, PHP, iOS, Android… if we work with multiplatform APIs we can write once and deploy our project for multiple targets.
So for many developers that come from Javascript, Actionscript, Java and so on, will be so easy to start deal with HaXe.
Another interesting thing of HaXe is that we can work with the library present in the SWF files and integrate movieclip in our project, we can create also SWF file without Flash Professional with SWFMill that is used for the generation of asset libraries containing images (PNG and JPEG), fonts (TTF) or other SWF movies.
That’s so interesting because it means that designers that usually prepare assets for developers don’t need to change own daily workflow!
If you need to extend your target platform we can add new features with external libraries, it’s so important because we can really cover everything with this feature; we can find a lot of ready to use libraries directly on the lib HaXe website.
With HaXe you can communicate between different languages like JS and Flash in both direction, you can easily find many frameworks and library porting in HaXe, for example javascript like JQuery, Sencha Touch, Node.JS and so on.

What about the IDE to work with HaXe (so important for a developer!)!?
On Mac you can use TextMate or FDT on Win FDT or FlashDevelop this one seems the best one but I didn’t try it. For more specs I suggest to take a look at HaXe site section, maybe you can find your favorite IDE in the list.

Finally I made an easy sample to understand better the powerful of HaXe NME, this sample loads an external XML file and an external SWF library with a movieclip inside exported for Actionscript, so I added a drag&drop feature to the list. Then I tried to compile it for iOS, Mac OS X Lion, C++ and SWF with the same basecode and everything work so well and smooth!


You can download source files here, to compile it take a look at HaXeNME section and you can find everything you need to try this sample and start to play with HaXeNME!

If you want to deal with HaXe, I suggest two books, the first one is really a good start to work with this fantastic language:
HaXe 2 beginner’s guide
Professional HaXe and Neko

Last but not least, next April in Paris there will be World Wide HaXe conference, I’ll be there to learn more about the future of this amazing platform if you are planning to be there it will be a pleasure for me catch up for a beer!

I hope soon to publish more experiments and informations about HaXe because it is a thrilling programming language!!!
So stay tuned!

Review: HTML5 Mobile Web Development

A couple of weeks ago I became blogger reviewer for O’really, so I take this opportunity to open my mind and learn new stuff about new technologies, programmation languages, etc.

So this is my first review and I start with an HTML5 video course.
Why am I talking about HTML5 in this blog? Because I think it’s important to know and learn if it could be useful in some projects or not.

Starting with this idea I’ve decided to watch this video course about HTML5 on mobile development.
Video courses aren’t my favorite media to learn new stuff because I love to sign my books, add some notes…you know what I mean… but this time I was really impressed about how O’Reilly organized it.
Seems you are in a real classroom with teacher in front of you that show code examples, tips & tricks using HTML5, CSS3 on iPad or iPhone.
Course is focused on mobile development, Jake Carter, the author, shows also Android world, how to configure your computer to work with emulator and simulator for Android, iPhone and so on.

I really love the way that he works in the classroom because first of all he explains the powerful of a particular feature, then show how to implement it and finally a little part of Q&A from internet people (I suppose).
During this video course you can learn useful stuff, take a look at table of contents in O’reilly website.
It was my first time with HTML5 and I think is an interesting technology, in particular, during this course I learn how to work with geolocation,  with JS and Canvas, with audio and video API and again how to save data directly on the device in a database.
I appreciate a lot al meta and css dedicated to iPhone and iPad, very useful.
Finally if you are interesting to learn a new way to develop on mobile, I suggest to take a look at this reference.
It’s useful, easy and I think is a fast method to learn.